20th International AIDS Conference - Melbourne, Australia


FRAD01 Drug Policy, Harm Reduction and Human Rights
  Oral Abstract Session : Track D
Venue: Plenary 2
Time: 25.07.2014, 11:00 - 12:30
Co-Chairs: Chad Hughes, Australia
Daniel Wolfe, United States

11:00
FRAD0101
Abstract
Powerpoint
Webcast
Reducing vulnerability of marginalized drug dependent communities in Nairobi Kenya through socioeconomic opportunities
H.O. Ogembo1, C. Orodo Angira2, B. Mbugua3, S. Abdallah3, R. Abdool3
1Nairobi Outreach Services Trust, Outreach/Data Management, Nairobi, Kenya, 2Nairobi Outreach Services Trust, Project Coordinator, Nairobi, Kenya, 3United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Regional Office for Eastern Africa (UNODC ROEA), Nairobi, Kenya

11:15
FRAD0102
Abstract
Powerpoint
Webcast
Policy breakthrough in needle and syringe program (NSP) for people who inject drugs (PWID) in Cebu City, Philippines
E. Dano1, I. Tac-an2, G. Belimac3, P. Zhao4
1Independent Consultant, Cebu, Philippines, 2Social Hygiene Clinic, City Health Office, Cebu, Philippines, 3National AIDS STI Prevention and Control Program, DOH, Manila, Philippines, 4WHO Western Pacific Regional Office, HIV/AIDS and STI Unit, Manila, Philippines

11:30
FRAD0103
Abstract
Powerpoint
Webcast
Impact evaluation of a training program on drug policy, HIV and human rights in Latin America
G. Touze1, P. Cymerman1, M.E. D´ Agostino2
1Intercambios Civil Association, Board of Directors, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 2Intercambios Civil Association, Advocacy, Buenos Aires, Argentina

11:45
FRAD0104
Abstract
Powerpoint
Webcast
Strategies to increase participation by women who inject drugs in available harm reduction services in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
S. Zamudio-Haas1, B. Lambdin2, B. Mahenge3, S. Likindikoki3, M. Dunbar4, J. Mbwambo3, O. Chang5
1University of California, Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, San Francisco, United States, 2Pangaea Global AIDS Foundation, Oakland, United States, 3Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, United Republic of, 4Pangaea Global AIDS Foundation, Harare, Zimbabwe, 5Pangaea Global AIDS, OaklandOakland, United States

12:00
FRAD0105
Abstract
Powerpoint
Webcast
Lawyering in the streets in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (presentation of project outcomes on 'Street Lawyers' for protecting and promoting the rights of women who use drugs)
E. Iakobishvili, O. Belyava
Eurasian Harm Reduction Network, Policy and Advocacy, Vilnius, Lithuania

12:15
FRAD0106
Webcast
Moderated discussion

Powerpoints presentations
Reducing vulnerability of marginalized drug dependent communities in Nairobi Kenya through socioeconomic opportunities - Hezron Okowe Ogembo

Policy breakthrough in needle and syringe program (NSP) for people who inject drugs (PWID) in Cebu City, Philippines - Pengfei Zhao

Impact evaluation of a training program on drug policy, HIV and human rights in Latin America - Graciela Touze

Strategies to increase participation by women who inject drugs in available harm reduction services in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania - Olivia Chang

Lawyering in the streets in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (presentation of project outcomes on 'Street Lawyers' for protecting and promoting the rights of women who use drugs) - Ekaterine Iakobishvili
Lawyering in the streets in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (presentation of project outcomes on 'Street Lawyers' for protecting and promoting the rights of women who use drugs) - Ekaterine Iakobishvili



Rapporteur report

Track D report by Le Minh Giang


The five presentations in this session highlighted innovative programs to address the intersections of drug policy, human rights and public health outcomes (including access to services) for PWUD in various parts of the world. Taken together, the presentations emphasized the importance of removing legal, service and other structural barriers that impede PWUD’s basic human rights, including rights to services and rights to dignified life. Projects that see PWUD as whole persons rather than as vectors of diseases, however, are often not funded or under-funded.

Ogembo described an innovative and low-threshold intervention to improve socio-economic conditions of PWUD in Nairobi, Kenya with the goal of improving their access to HIV and drug treatment. Intervention included daily meals, showers, vocational training, and loans. Over a twelve month period, the study observed changes in behavioral outcomes, access to services, and other health related outcomes. Although the study methodology is questionable, especially in terms of attributing outcomes to the interventions, it showed that improving socio-economic conditions and meeting basic needs of PWUD are important venues leading to HIV-related changes.

Zhao described the process and outcomes of setting up an NSP programs in Cebu, the Philippines. The program had to overcome conflicts in the laws (AIDS vs. drug laws) and the reluctance of both national and local governments to take initiative. The program, with support from WHO, worked directly with the local Department of Health in Cebu. Once consensus were built among key stakeholders at the local level, the program was able to build 9 one-stop shop facilities with comprehensive services for PWUD. Service data over a period of one year showed increase in service uptake. Similar models are to be replicated in other localities

Touze described a training initiative in Latin America to improve understanding the intersection of drug policy, human rights and public health as well as to provide participants with practical tools to defend drug user’s rights. The preliminary assessment showed changes in perception towards drug use as well as practices of participants. The initiative showed that challenging common misconceptions about drug users is a key tool to build a more balanced discourse centered in public health and human rights.

 

Chang presented results of qualitative study to identify barriers for accessing available harm reduction services by women who use drugs in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The study explored barriers in outreach, access to medically assisted therapy (MAT), and retention in services. The authors concluded that “The same gendered inequities that drive the greater need for HIV prevention and treatment among women who inject drugs reduce access to harm reduction services.” They further recommend strategies to reduce gendered barriers for women. 

 Iakobishvili presented the work by EURASIAN Harm Reduction Network in five Eastern European and Central Asia countries over a period of two years. They recruit “street lawyers” who are women drug users themselves, and the goal is to “allow women who use drugs to position themselves as human rights defenders in their respective communities.” These “street lawyers” go out to teach women about their rights, document human rights abuses and advocacy with/and/by women who use drugs (WUD). The program has documented human rights abuse and has planned to use this database for future targeted policy and advocacy actions.




   

    The organizers reserve the right to amend the programme.