20th International AIDS Conference - Melbourne, Australia


MOSA15 Reaching young key populations: Scaling up approaches
  Non-Commercial Satellite
Venue: Room 104
Time: 21.07.2014, 18:30 - 20:30
Co-Chairs: Anita Krug, Australia
Pablo T. Aguilera, Netherlands

Organizer: Interagency Working Group on Key populations and the IAS Collaborative Initiative on Paediatric HIV Education ans Research (CIPHER)
This satellite session will be the official launch of the draft technical briefs on HIV and young key populations produced by the Interagency Working Group on Key Populations – making them come alive through presentations mixed with dialogues, and a panel discussion with questions from the audience. It brings together young activists, government, UN and research institutions to make a passionate call to action for creative and sustainable solutions to the development and scaling up of programmes for and with young key populations at higher risk of HIV infections.
18:30
Introduction to the draft technical briefs on young key populations
P. Aguilera, Netherlands

18:35

Powerpoint
The realities of young key populations: what is the evidence?
M. Choo, Malaysia

18:50

Powerpoint
A response that fits our needs: perspectives from young people from key populations: a dialogue
H. Gercio, Philippines
B. Gurung, Nepal
V. Lieu, Vietnam

19:10

Powerpoint
Tailoring services on the ground: reaching young key populations
D. Diouf, Senegal
A. Barra, Mexico
J. Mathenge, Kenya
N. Chaiyajit, Thailand
R. Greifinger, United States

19:50
Legal and policy considerations in reaching young key populations
F. Rahman, Malaysia

20:05

Powerpoint
Panel discussion
R. Baggaley, WHO
J. Butler, United States
F. Hariga, UNODC
C. Luo, UNICEF

20:25
Closing address
A. Krug, Australia

Powerpoints presentations
The realities of young key populations: what is the evidence? - Martin Choo

A response that fits our needs: perspectives from young people from key populations: a dialogue -

Tailoring services on the ground: reaching young key populations -

Panel discussion -



Rapporteur report

Youth report by Sally Beadle


The social and structural conditions that compound HIV risk among key populations are even more acute among young people. In this context, young people need dedicated services that cater specifically to their needs. This satellite session brought together young activists, with government, UN and research institutions to make a passionate call to action for creative and sustainable solutions to the development and scaling up of programmes with and for young key populations. It introduced the recently released WHO Joint Programme technical briefs on programmes for young key populations.

The session opened with a summary of the literature that has informed the development of the technical briefs. The literature points to multiple and overlapping vulnerabilities faced by young key populations which heighten their risk of HIV exposure. However, there remain significant gaps in the evidence. There was a call for investment in research including community-led research that captures the voices of affected young people through case studies and community consultations.

Other highlights of the session included a panel discussion of young people representing key populations about the challenges that their communities continue to face and calling for interventions that cater for the specific needs of key populations. An overview of key policy and legal barriers that continue to impede progress was presented. While these structural barriers often seem difficult to shift, the presenter highlighted the power of ‘baby steps’ in moving forward including building closer relationships with politicians and police, sharing promising programmes and attracting positive media attention. While it was clear that there is a long way to go – particularly in addressing structural barriers – several promising programmes that are making a difference at a local level were noted.

In a question and answer session with young people and representatives of the Inter-Agency Working Group, there was a strong call for more discussion around the ‘protection’ of young people who sell sex. It was argued that the concept of child protection is being misinterpreted in many settings and leading to young people under 18 being forcibly removed into detention or state care where they face further harm. As one panellist said we need to look closely at ‘what the evidence actually shows in terms of whether laws that are supposed to protect children from exploitation actually cause more harm’. To date she said, this is a conversation that has been avoided. Panellists and audience members called for an urgent discussion around this issue. They also urged the Working Group to release the final technical briefs as soon as possible.




   

    The organizers reserve the right to amend the programme.