20th International AIDS Conference - Melbourne, Australia


TUPDD01 Curious Social Scientists: Innovative Approaches and Questions
  Oral Poster Discussion Session : Track D
Venue: Room 101-102
Time: 22.07.2014, 13:00 - 14:00
Co-Chairs: Simon Rosser, United States
Lorraine Sherr, United Kingdom

13:00
TUPDD0101
Abstract
CBPR process with the sex worker community in Kolkata, India
S. Ali1, R. Dolui2, L. Small3
1New York University, New York, United States, 2Durbar, Kolkata, India, 3New York University Silver School of Social Work, McSilver Institute for Poverty Policy and Research, New York, United States

13:05
TUPDD0102
Abstract
Powerpoint
The value of PLHIV led research - how to change laws. Policies and practice with less
J. Hows1, E. Banda2, N. Otwoma3, M.O. Irogo4, M. Zazini5
1Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+), Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2MANET+ the Malawi Network of People Living with HIV, Lilongwe, Malawi, 3NEPHAK - National Empowerment Network of People Living with HIV/AIDS, Nairobi, Kenya, 4ReCAP+, Yaounde, Cameroon, 5NAPWA (South Africa), Germiston, South Africa

13:10
TUPDD0103
Abstract
Powerpoint
Supporting the voice and public VIHSIBILITÉ of people living with HIV-AIDS: results from an action-research on ethical practices of coproduction
M.N. Mensah1, R. Legare2, M.-E. Gauvin3, A. Hot4, Testimonial Cultures and VIHSIBILITÉ Research Group
1Université du Québec à Montréal, École de Travail Social, Montreal, Canada, 2Coalition des Organismes Communautaires Québécois de Lutte Contre le Sida (COCQ-SIDA), Montreal, Canada, 3Cegep Régional de Lanaudiere, Social Work, Terrebonne, Canada, 4COCQ-SIDA, Community-Based Research, Montreal, Canada

13:15
TUPDD0104
Abstract
Powerpoint
Towards a science of community engagement in biomedical HIV prevention trials: an embedded multiple case study in Canada, India, South Africa and Thailand
P.A. Newman1, C.C. Rubincam1, D.-M. Chuang1, G. Lindegger2, C. Slack2, V. Chakrapani3, M. Shanmugam3, S. Tepjan1, S. Roungprakhon4, Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative Team in Social and Behavioral Research on HIV Vaccines
1University of Toronto, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, Toronto, Canada, 2University of KwaZulu-Natal, Psychology, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, 3Centre for Sexuality and Health Research and Policy, Chennai, India, 4Rajamangala University of Technology Phra Nakhon, Computer Technology, Bangkok, Thailand

13:20
TUPDD0105
Abstract
Powerpoint
Intruders with questions and justified fears - reflections on the experiences of research staff implementing rapid, qualitative research in 9 HPTN071 (PopART) community sites in Western Cape Province, South Africa
K. Abrahams1, J. Mantantana1, G. Hoddinott1, L. Viljoen1, H. Ayles2,3, N. Beyers1, P. Bock1, S. Fidler4, R. Hayes5, J. Seeley6,7, V. Bond2,8
1University of Stellenbosch, Desmond Tutu TB Centre, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Cape Town, South Africa, 2Zambia AIDS-related Tuberculosis Project (ZAMBART), Lusaka, Zambia, 3London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Department of Clinical Research, Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London, United Kingdom, 4Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom, 5London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London, United Kingdom, 6University of East Anglia, School of International Development, Norwich, United Kingdom, 7MRC/UVRI Uganda Research Unit on AIDS, Entebbe, Uganda, 8London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Department of Global Health and Development, Faculty of Public Health and Policy, London, United Kingdom

13:25
TUPDD0106
Moderated discussion

Powerpoints presentations
The value of PLHIV led research - how to change laws. Policies and practice with less - Eddie Banda

Supporting the voice and public VIHSIBILITÉ of people living with HIV-AIDS: results from an action-research on ethical practices of coproduction - Maria Nengeh Mensah

Towards a science of community engagement in biomedical HIV prevention trials: an embedded multiple case study in Canada, India, South Africa and Thailand - Peter A. Newman

Intruders with questions and justified fears - reflections on the experiences of research staff implementing rapid, qualitative research in 9 HPTN071 (PopART) community sites in Western Cape Province, South Africa - Graeme Hoddinott



Rapporteur report

Track D report by Peter Aggleton


Simon Rosser and Lorraine Sherr introduced the session by outlining its focus on innovative approaches to social science enquiry.

Latoya Small talked about an innovative academic-community partnership with Durbar, a sex worker collective in Kolkata.  The pilot project she described had used group work sessions and discussions to open up and strengthen mother-child sexual health communication intervention.  Positive results are encouraging the team to consider ways of expanding the work undertaken.

Eddie Banda described the value of research led by people living with HIV, including the development of a people living with HIV stigma index and a global HIV criminalization scan.  In Malawi, MANET+ (a local NGO) developed 5 advocacy policy briefs based on research led by HIV positive people.  This was successful in encouraging  government to remove d4T from the approved list of ART.  A later policy brief (also based on research led by HIV positive people, proved successful to ensuring greater access to sexual and reproductive health and HIV treatment services for key populations.

Maria Nengeh Mensah presented results from an action research project undertaken in collaboration with a coalition of Quebec community groups.  The focus of the work has been on how people with HIV tell their stories in the media, in research, and in public fora.  Among the issues addressed are the ethics of encouraging and supporting people to publicly tell their stories.  Key here are issues of informed consent, the ownership (of words and image), and recompense.  The project’s work has stressed the importance of support before, during and after public visibility.

Peter Newman described some of the prerequisites for the development of a ‘science’ of community engagement in biomedical trials.  Drawing on findings from research in Thailand, India, South Africa and Canada, his paper stressed the importance of ensuring trial literacy, addressing mistrust, and ensuring meaningful stakeholder engagement.  Ethical integrity and clear and concise communication are key to a successful approach

Graeme Hoddinott’s presentation focused on the importance of reflexivity in social research, particularly as an aid to understanding research outcomes.  It stressed how researchers remain ‘others’ (signalled by dialect differences, the clothes worn and the fact that the questions asked are generally different from those in everyday life) even when apparently accepted  by community members.  The reactivity engendered by researchers’ own presence needs identifying and accounting for as part of the research process.

In discussion, different means of achieving reflexivity were discussed.  The value of research providing evidence as well as leading to conversation between peers was stressed.  Community members really need to feel an integral part of the process.  Making clear to research participants the past harms and past regret associated with research is also important.  So too is the value of  empowering community members to doing research.  The difficulties (but also the successes) of ensuring that community research principles are fully integrated into ethics review processes were also discussed.  




   

    The organizers reserve the right to amend the programme.