20th International AIDS Conference - Melbourne, Australia


WEPDB01 Wrestling with Adherence: Strategies for Success
  Oral Poster Discussion Session : Track B
Venue: Room 103
Time: 23.07.2014, 13:00 - 14:00
Co-Chairs: Manuel Battegay, Switzerland
James McMahon, Australia

13:00
WEPDB0101
Abstract
Powerpoint
Disagreement between caregiver-reported adherence to antiretroviral therapy and electronic dose monitoring among HIV-infected children in Western Kenya
M. Scanlon1,2, W. Nyandiko2,3, T. Inui2,4, S. Ayaya2,3, R. Vreeman1,2
1Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Children's Health Services Research, Indianapolis, United States, 2Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH), Eldoret, Kenya, 3Moi University, College of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Department of Child Health and Paediatrics, Eldoret, Kenya, 4Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Indianapolis, United States

13:05
WEPDB0102
Abstract
Powerpoint
Factors associated with antiretroviral therapy adherence in HIV-infected children in Western Kenya
M. Scanlon1,2, W. Nyandiko2,3, T. Inui2,4, S. Ayaya2,3, R. Vreeman1,2
1Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Children's Health Services Research, Indianapolis, United States, 2Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH), Eldoret, Kenya, 3Moi University, College of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Department of Child Health and Paediatrics, Eldoret, Kenya, 4Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Indianapolis, United States

13:10
WEPDB0103
Abstract
Do single tablet regimens translate into more durable HIV treatments? Evidence from the Canadian observational cohort (CANOC)
N. Machouf1, L. Szadkowski2, B. Trottier1, R. Thomas1, M. Hull3,4, A.N. Burchell5,6, C. Cooper7, R.S. Hogg4,8, M.B. Klein9, M.R. Loutfy6,10, J.S.G. Montaner3,4, C. Tsoukas9, J.M. Raboud2,6, CANOC Collaboration
1Clinique Médicale l'Actuel, Recherche, Montreal, Canada, 2University Health Network, Toronto, Canada, 3University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, 4BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, Vancouver, Canada, 5Ontario HIV Treatment Network, Toronto, Canada, 6University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, 7Ottawa Hospital, Division of Infectious Diseases, Ottawa, Canada, 8Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada, 9McGill University, Montreal, Canada, 10Women's College Research Institute, Toronto, Canada

13:15
WEPDB0104
Abstract
Powerpoint
Improving adherence to antiretroviral therapy through real-time feedback: the China adherence through technology study (CATS)
L. Sabin1,2, M. Bachman DeSilva1,2, T. Vian1,2, C.J. Gill1,2, L. Zhong3, F. Cheng4, W. Xie5, M. Fox6, K. Xu7, J. Haberer8, D. Bangsberg8, A.L. Gifford9
1Boston University School of Public Health, Department of Global Health, Boston, United States, 2Boston University, Center for Global Health and Development, Boston, United States, 3FHI 360, Beijing, China, 4Global Health Strategies, Beijing, China, 5FHI 360, Nanning, China, 6Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, United States, 7Ditan Hospital, Beijing, China, 8Massachusetts General Hospital, Center for Global Health, Boston, United States, 9Boston University School of Public Health, Health Policy and Management, Boston, United States

13:20
WEPDB0105
Moderated discussion

Powerpoints presentations
Disagreement between caregiver-reported adherence to antiretroviral therapy and electronic dose monitoring among HIV-infected children in Western Kenya - Michael Scanlon

Factors associated with antiretroviral therapy adherence in HIV-infected children in Western Kenya - Rachel Vreeman

Improving adherence to antiretroviral therapy through real-time feedback: the China adherence through technology study (CATS) - Matthew Fox



Rapporteur report

Track B report by Michael (John) Gill


In a session disrupted by late arrivals Michael Scanlon and R Vreeman  presented data from  two different aspects of a study examining adherence in 191 HIV infected children in Western Kenya. Adherence as reported as missed doses by the child’s caregiver was compared to that pill container opening recorded by MEMS cap.The main caregiver underestimated the number of missed doses compared to MEMS caps records especially with older children, work outside the house and involvement of  multiple caregivers. When looking at social factors associated with documented  low adherence  a younger age, being female, maternal caregiver, work outside the home for primary caregiver along with food insecurity were factors associated with low adherence.

R Thomas presented orally on a Canadian observational  study suggesting that Single tablet formulations may not be as beneficial in improving adherence as originally hoped.

M Fox  presented a study in China evaluating new technology for monitoring and supporting adherence where pill counter reported opening to a central server and a dose 30 minutes off schedule triggered a reminder to patients cell phone. Improved adherence was documented by this technology use in both low adherence and high adherence when compared to lead in study period. The technology was very well received by patients . This study showed more benefit than an earlier study in Africa.




   

    The organizers reserve the right to amend the programme.