20th International AIDS Conference - Melbourne, Australia


MOAB02 Cutting Edge Issues in TB and HIV
  Oral Abstract Session : Track B
Venue: Plenary 2
Time: 21.07.2014, 16:30 - 18:00
Co-Chairs: Haileyesus Getahun, WHO
Wafaa El-Sadr, United States

16:30
MOAB0201
Powerpoint
Webcast
TB and HIV in my region: is anyone listening?
S. Swaminathan, India

16:45
MOAB0202
Abstract
Powerpoint
Webcast
Randomized trial of the bactericidal activity of 8-weeks treatment with moxifloxacin, Pa-824, and pyrazinamide in drug sensitive and multi-drug resistant tuberculosis
D. Everitt1, R. Dawson2, A. Diacon3, D. Burger4, R. Schall5, C. Van Niekerk6, A. Conradie6, C. Mendel1
1Global Alliance for TB Drug Development, R&D, New York, United States, 2University of Cape Town, Division of Pulmonology, Department of Medicine, Cape Town, South Africa, 3Stellenbosch University and Task Applied Sciences, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Cape Town, South Africa, 4University of Free State, and Quintiles, Bloemfontein, South Africa, 5University of Free State, Department of Biostatistics, Bloemfontein, South Africa, 6Global Alliance for TB Drug Development, R&D, Pretoria, South Africa

17:00
MOAB0203
Abstract
Powerpoint
Webcast
Reduced treatment delays for drug-resistant TB/HIV co-infected patients with decentralized care and rapid Xpert MTB/RIF test in Khayelitsha, South Africa
H. Cox1, J. Hughes2, S. Moyo3, J. Daniels3, G. van Cutsem4, V. Azevedo5, V. Cox3
1University of Cape Town, Medical Microbiology, Cape Town, South Africa, 2Medecins Sans Frontieres Khayelitsha, Khayelitsha, Cape Town, South Africa, 3Medecins Sans Frontieres Khayelitsha, Cape Town, South Africa, 4Medecins Sans Frontieres South Africa, Cape Town, South Africa, 5City of Cape Town, Health, Cape Town, South Africa

17:15
MOAB0204
Abstract
Powerpoint
Webcast
Safety and immunogenicity of H1/IC31®, an adjuvanted TB subunit vaccine, in HIV-infected adults with CD4+ lymphocyte counts greater than 350 cells/mm3: a phase II, multi-centre, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial
K. Reither1,2,3, L. Katsoulis4, T. Beattie4, N. Gardiner4, N. Lenz1,2, K. Said3, E. Mfinanga3, C. Pohl1,2,3, K.L. Fielding5, H. Jeffery5, B. Kagina6, E.J. Hughes6, W. Hannekom6, S.T. Hoff7, P. Bang8, I. Kromann8, C. Daubenberger1,2, P. Andersen7, G.J. Churchyard4,5,9
1Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland, 2University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland, 3Ifakara Health Institute, Bagamoyo, Tanzania, United Republic of, 4Aurum Institute for Health Research, Johannesburg, South Africa, 5London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom, 6South African TB Vaccine Initiative, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa, 7Statens Serum Institute, Department of Infectious Disease Immunology, Copenhagen, Denmark, 8Statens Serum Institute, Department of Vaccine Development, Copenhagen, Denmark, 9School of Public Health, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

17:30
MOAB0205LB
Abstract
Powerpoint
Webcast
Performance of Xpert MTB/RIF testing for M.tuberculosis (TB) detection in HIV+ and HIV- pulmonary TB suspects in low versus high TB prevalence settings: the ACTG 5295/TBTC 34 study
A. Luetkemeyer1, C. Firnhaber2, M.A. Kendall3, X. Wu3, D. Benator4, G.H. Mazurek5, B. Metchock5, P. Johnson6, S. Swindells7, I. Sanne2, D.V. Havlir1, B. Grinsztejn8, D. Alland9, ACTG A5295/TBTC 34 Study Teams
1San Francisco General Hospital, University of California, San Francisco, HIV/AIDS, San Francisco, United States, 2University of Witswatersrand, Clinical HIV Research Unit, Johannesburg, South Africa, 3Harvard School of Public Health, Center for Biostatistics in AIDS Research, Boston, United States, 4Washington DC Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Infectious Diseases Clinic, Washington, United States, 5Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, Atlanta, United States, 6Cepheid, Sunnyvale, United States, 7University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, United States, 8Instituto de Pesquisa Clinica Evandro Chagas Fiocruz, Rio de Janiero, Brazil, 9New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, Newark, United States

17:45
MOAB0206
Webcast
Moderated discussion

Powerpoints presentations
TB and HIV in my region: is anyone listening? - Soumya Swaminathan

Randomized trial of the bactericidal activity of 8-weeks treatment with moxifloxacin, Pa-824, and pyrazinamide in drug sensitive and multi-drug resistant tuberculosis - Daniel Everitt

Reduced treatment delays for drug-resistant TB/HIV co-infected patients with decentralized care and rapid Xpert MTB/RIF test in Khayelitsha, South Africa - Helen Cox

Safety and immunogenicity of H1/IC31®, an adjuvanted TB subunit vaccine, in HIV-infected adults with CD4+ lymphocyte counts greater than 350 cells/mm3: a phase II, multi-centre, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial - Klaus Reither

Performance of Xpert MTB/RIF testing for M.tuberculosis (TB) detection in HIV+ and HIV- pulmonary TB suspects in low versus high TB prevalence settings: the ACTG 5295/TBTC 34 study - Anne Luetkemeyer



Rapporteur report

Track B report by Mark Bloch


The session focused on the latest issues in TB and HIV co-infection.

Dr S. Swaminthan gave an overview  - globally 1/3 of people with HIV have TB and TB one of the commonest cause of death in HIV.  The most sensitive and specific clinical measure of TB is the combination of cough, fever, night sweats and weight loss. There has been a scale up  of novel laboratory testing, particularly the XPert rapid point of care test giving results in hours and can determine rifampicin resistance. In HIV the test is 78% specific and 98% sensitive. Multidrug TB (MDR TB) prevalence is approximately 2% and can be predicted by baseline isoniazid (INH) resistance, high bacterial load and low CD4 count. The key to successful treatment will be decentralisation of services and integration with other health services.

Dr D. Everitt presented the results of NC-002 phase 2 randomised study using 3 drugs Pa-824, moxifloxacin (M) and pyrazinamide (Z) for 8 weeks in South Africa and Tanzania, enrolling 207 patients, 20% with HIV. Drug sensitive arms had Pa 200mg or 100mg + M + Z or 4-drug standard of care; with a drug resistant arm given Pa 200mg + M+ Z. Time to negative TB culture was significantly reduced in the Pa arms and no difference in HIV. AEs similar across groups.

Dr H. Cox examined the use of rapid Xpert MTB testing in Khayelitsha township Cape Town, South Africa where the testing in 10 decentralised clinics reduced time from diagnosis to treatment from previous 50 days to 7 days.

Dr K. Reither  from Swiss TPH examined the safety and immunogenicity of a H1/IC31 TB vaccine in a phase 2 placebo controlled study of 48 participants in Africa aged 18-55yrs with HIV,  CD4>350. Localised but not systemic AEs were higher in vaccination group. There was sustained immune response to IFN gamma, TNF alpha and IL2 but not IL17 in the vaccination group. Thus there was a persistent TH1 immune response and vaccination was safe and well tolerated.

Dr A. Luektemeyer presented AGTG 5295/TBTC 34 examining Xpert sensitivity and specificity in low TB prevalence and in HIV populations.  She found excellent performance in these settings.




   

    The organizers reserve the right to amend the programme.