20th International AIDS Conference - Melbourne, Australia


THBS02 Treatment as Prevention
  Bridging Session
Venue: Plenary 2
Time: 24.07.2014, 11:00 - 12:30
Chair: Richard Horton, United Kingdom

The session will discuss treatment as prevention (TasP) from the science, community and policy perspective and will offer insights into what implementing TasP entails including social, cultural and economic aspects. The panelists will discuss the scientific perspective including the latest data on TasP and will review and assess how implementation is playing out in practice and offer examples of best practices. The session will analyze the role of the community in strengthening TasP approaches and addressing bottlenecks, including questions of access as well as ethical aspects. Finally, panelists will examine the challenges of large-scale implementation and discuss examples at country-level and the need for leadership. At the completion of the session, the participants will understand current guidelines and their possible impact in different epidemic settings, have a better comprehension of community perspectives, and will be able to identify implications, trade-offs and operational requirements of implementing TasP on a larger scale.
11:00
THBS0201
Webcast
Introduction

11:04
THBS0202
Powerpoint
Webcast
Report back from the 2014 Treatment as Prevention Workshop
J. Montaner, Canada

11:12
THBS0203
Webcast
Science perspective
M. Cohen, United States
Q. Karim, South Africa

11:27
THBS0204
Webcast
Community perspective
E. Bernard, United Kingdom
N. Ao, Thailand

11:42
THBS0205
Powerpoint
Webcast
Leadership perspective
F. Mesquita, Brazil

11:57
THBS0206
Webcast
Questions and answers

12:27
THBS0207
Webcast
Closing remarks

Powerpoints presentations
Report back from the 2014 Treatment as Prevention Workshop - Julio Montaner

Leadership perspective - Fábio Mesquita



Rapporteur report

Track D report by Carlos F. Caceres


This bridging session, entitled “Treatment as Prevention” (TasP), discussed this topic from the science, community and policy perspectives, and offered insights into what implementing TasP entails in the read world, including social, cultural and economic aspects. The changing relevance of the terms “treatment as prevention” and even “early treatment for prevention”, given quickly evolving guidelines about the time to start treatment, was pointed out early in the session.


Julio Montaner, from Canada, presented a report of the TasP Workshop (Vancouver, April 2014), including a summary of follow-up data from the research trials, and programmatic data related to the impact of treatment in viral load in Vancouver and other places.

Then, Quarraisha Abdul-Karim presented the perspective of ongoing research. She showed the latest data on TasP and reviewed and assessed how implementation is playing out in practice and offered examples of best practices from South Africa.

Then, E. Bernard (UK) and N. Ao (Thailand) presented a range of community perspectives. They analyzed the role of the community in strengthening TasP approaches and addressing bottlenecks, including questions of access as well as ethical aspects. They also identified a number of issues around human rights that become a focus of concern in TasP implementation; e.g. the fact that implementing TasP may elicit both positive and negative consequences for people’s human rights in the field.

Finally, Fabio Mesquita (Brazil), the Director of the Brazilian AIDS Program, presented on Leadership. He examined the challenges of large-scale implementation and focused on the Brazilian case to discuss the role of various factors (programmatic, community, policy) and particularly the role of commitment and leadership. He emphasized on specific issues related to key populations.

The audience posed a broad number of questions, which, under the moderation of Richard Horton (The Lancet, UK) were responded by panelists. Many of them focused on concerns about sustainability, tensions between early treatment for prevention and any treatment for those who presently lack access to it, and also the need for consent and the potential human rights abuses posed by implementation of early treatment for prevention. The session offered an opportunity to better understand current treatment guidelines and their possible impact on various epidemic settings, have a better comprehension of community perspectives, and be able to identify implications, trade-offs and operational requirements of implementing TasP on a larger scale.




   

    The organizers reserve the right to amend the programme.