20th International AIDS Conference - Melbourne, Australia


TUWS02 "HIV Cure" 101
  Scientific Development Workshop
Venue: Room 103
Time: 22.07.2014, 11:00 - 12:30
Co-Facilitators: Sarah Palmer, Australia
Jeffrey Lifson, United States
David Margolis, United States

Level: Foundation
Target audience: Peer educator, General educator/trainer
Seating limits: 130
The aim of this workshop is to facilitate discussions around current research and developments in relation to a HIV cure. This workshop is targeted at those living with HIV and AIDS, clinicians, and researchers. It seeks to reach out to non-scientists, and laymen who have a strong interest in the development of a cure for HIV but who may not be fully aware of the current state of the field. Participants will leave the workshop with a working knowledge of the concepts and language around “cure” research. They will develop an understanding of the viral reservoir, what it consists of, where it is located and how it can be assessed. They will understand the strategies proposed to reduce or eliminate the reservoir and the difference between a functional and sterilizing cure and the different meanings associated with “eradication of HIV” when applied to an individual compared to its use when referring to populations
11:00
TUWS0201
Introduction

11:05
TUWS0202
Powerpoint
Current community questions and concerns about "HIV Cure"
B. Whittaker, Australia

11:15
TUWS0203
Group discussions

11:30
TUWS0204
Powerpoint
Challenges in identifying and targeting the HIV reservoir
S. Palmer, Australia

11:45
TUWS0205
Powerpoint
Strategies for targeting and eradicating the HIV reservoir
J. Lifson, United States

12:00
TUWS0206
Powerpoint
Towards an HIV Cure: medical, social, and ethical challenges in research and testing
D. Margolis, United States

12:15
TUWS0207
Questions and answers

Powerpoints presentations
Current community questions and concerns about "HIV Cure" - Bill Whittaker

Challenges in identifying and targeting the HIV reservoir - Sarah Palmer

Strategies for targeting and eradicating the HIV reservoir - Jeffrey Lifson

Towards an HIV Cure: medical, social, and ethical challenges in research and testing - David Margolis



Rapporteur report

Track B report by Cristina Mussini


The session “HIV cure 101” was dedicated to discussions around current research and developments in relation to a HIV cure. The main topic was what is a reservoir, what it consist of, where it is located and how it can be assessed. Then, strategies to reduce or eliminate the reservoir have been explained in a simple and understandable language for those living with HIV/AIDS, non-scientists and laymen fighting against HIV.

The first speaker, B. Whitaker, discussed several hot points regarding community questions and concerns about “HIV Cure” research. In particular, he underlined the importance of the Communities in the participation in HIV cure: altruism is a key word. The dialog between the communities is crucial in partnering in HIV research and clinical studies, but cure research is not a sole responsibility of governments, and must be supported also by private foundations. Australian communities have strongly supported efforts for the reservoir eradication studies. Discussants pointed out the importance of  traditional practitioners, as well as the fact that sometimes feedback does not go back to the communities.

Dr. S. Palmer presented the basic aspects regarding the difficulties in finding were HIV is hiding, in measuring viral activity (where, and how), and gave precise definitions on the meaning of persistent viremia and viral reservoir. She showed changes in viremia after successful treatment in the 720 study, that was characterized by a biphasic decline over 7 years of treatment, and where all subjects had at least one sample with detectable viremia ≥ 1copy/ml.

Dr. J.D. Lifson defined the concepts of active or latent reservoir, of pharmacological and immunological sanctuaries, and the problem of long living infected cells. He also indicated the main challenges for HIV cure, that are and the necessity to eliminate even the cell containing the “last virus” capable of recrudescence. 

Finally, Dr. D. Margolis showed some strategies used to activate infected cells or to disrupt viral latency, that have then to be eliminated by the immune response. The recent trials an studies using Vorinostat were presented and discussed. He concluded presenting research, ethical and social challenges, and proposing modules that have to be developed by communities and scientific partners.

 




   

    The organizers reserve the right to amend the programme.